Jordanian Sweets

#017


One of my friends called me the Sultan of Sugar because I take my sweet tooth seriously. When it comes to photographing dessert that isn’t exclusive to the photographer (and meant for the family), there probably won’t be much left if you don’t get to it in time. Still, I managed to snatch away some dessert that I ate after putting down my camera.

 
Undisputed.

Undisputed.

 

Though I don’t remember the flavors, I do recall the small joys of eating the bite-sized baklava. First, your fingers feel the sugary viscous syrup, then you taste it. Crunching ensues, and depending on the pastry texture, it can be flat or fibrous and paired with nuts. Here’s a before version of the cashew baklava from Jordan’s Al-Hamawi Roastery:

Using just daylight and a Corelle dinner plate, I photographed it leaning against another piece that I used as a stand. If you haven’t noticed, I like to replace backgrounds with solid colors, so I turned to Photoshop. Even though it’s becoming increasingly sophisticated, I still had to manually adjust the masking tool’s parameters for the desired results. Take a look at the after version:

The pistachio baklava below from Jordan’s Habibah Sweets was my favorite one. Its thin pastry layers look like pages in a book and function like a honeycomb that retains its syrup. Most of the syrup permeates the base pastry layers, which is why it’s usually the stickiest there. Mmm.

Initially, I liked the pastry’s beige tone as a background color, but the pistachios’ green would look electrifying, I thought. So here’s what happened next:

Now, we’re talking! The Sultan of Sugar approves the pop of color—okay, I’ll stop. Before I move on to the next dessert, here’s a picture of the countless types of baklava on display at Habibah Sweets! I wish they would open up a boutique in Houston.

Image courtesy of Sai

The last to be photographed and eaten was a cookie with a slice of pistachio as its crown jewel from Al-Hamawi Roastery. It was, of course, on the drier side and mildly sweet compared to baklava, which makes it suitable to be eaten as a light snack with tea.

Using these dessert pictures, I designed three new patterns that I think would look cool on clothing or a baklava shop’s wallpaper! You can check them out by clicking/tapping the button below!

Thanks for reading, and I hope you enjoyed the pictures! Which of the sweets or pattern designs was your favorite and why? Please let me know in the comments below.

Until next time,

Asad